The Melloncollies
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Rhythm Guitar, Lead Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Bass Guitar, Drums, Other Percussion, Violin, Keyboard, Piano, Background Singer, Cello.

ABOUT

“The Melloncollies are great because they stay true to who they are . . . a band that wants to
put out great music filled with passion, a band that’s not afraid to defy stereotyped musical
genres. Goodbye Cruel World is an album filled with excitement because of this.”
—Samantha Cox, BMI
Simon Erani is the force behind The Melloncollies and their debut album Goodbye Cruel World.
He prefers to wear his real-life melancholy on his sleeve like a badge of honor. And as the band
creates a unique blend of everything from 80’s synth pop to 90’s arena grunge rock, the lyrics draw
creative inspiration from one of mankind’s oldest and most universal sources—a broken heart.
From the first seconds of the melodically-drenched opening track “Bullet In My Sunday,” Erani’s
vocals and keyboards, Peter Claro’s guitars and bass, and Darros Sandler’s drums combine with an
energy and ferocity that make this Brooklyn-based band sound like anything but a freshman act.
Just as you find yourself singing along with the last chorus (“Oblige me by taking aim /And please
put a bullet in my Sunday”), the hook-laden “Simple Naïve Someone” has you believing in love
again.
While Erani’s vocals may bring to mind such unabashedly clean pop singers as Bleu or Robin
Wilson of The Gin Blossoms, he can also muster up the rock-and-roll rawness of Paul Westerberg
of The Replacements or Dave Pirner of Soul Asylum. Such is the case with the track “You You
Yeah Yeah,” a raucous night-driving wailer in pursuit of yet another what-went-wrong (“I gave up
my world to you you yeah yeah / What the hell did you do for me?”). In striking contrast, a string
quartet joins a lonely nylon-stringed guitar as the rock ballad “All I Want” answers that angry
question with crestfallen acceptance (“I’m here alone and always wondering why / Everything so
wrong is never right”).
“Let It Rain” picks up the pace with a driving four-on-the-floor beat reminiscent of The
Cranberries’ hit “Dream,” and Erani once again turns a storm into a renewing baptism as he sings
this open letter to an absent father (“Please forgive me if I cursed you / Please believe me if I can’t
have you / Let it rain”). Then with the surprising edginess of Billy Corgan backed by bright
crunchy guitars and Smashing Pumpkins-sized drumbeats, “Why Oh Why” hits on the irony of
conflicted relationships (“I go and make love to you / But I’m beginning to hate you”), followed by
a peaceful moment of hopeful reflection in the beautiful ballad “Maybe Someday” (“Love will find
a way / I’ll give my heart to you someday / Maybe someday”).
This near-optimism continues to twist through the straight-ahead rocker “Misery” (“I’ll be good to
you / Come back to me / And end this life of misery”) and the buzzy “Criminal Girl” (“Hey baby /
lay me down / and walk all over me”), then turns back to the solitary sadness of lost love in the
Wallflowers-like “The Loneliest Boy” (“I can’t live another day / I’m the loneliest boy in the world
without you”). “Money Money Money” ends the album in a raucous nosedive, with flaming guitars
and double-time drums playing Oasis to Erani’s Dylan as he unveils the “real” reason for his
perpetually crashing romantic life—and yours (“Could you believe the audacity / People wake up
and see / She only wants your money”). For the diehard fans, the full-album download also
includes a stunning acoustic guitar and string quartet version of “Let It Rain.”
Produced by Peter Claro and Simon Erani and mastered by Blake Morgan, Goodbye Cruel World
makes Erani’s songs resonate with past angst and buried emotions while The Melloncollies
simultaneously radiate with a genuine enthusiasm and sincerity rarely encountered in today’s
pop/rock scene. Together with the support of their label Somme Music and new worldwide
distribution through Engine Company Records, the band is poised to capture a whole new audience
of freshly broken hearts around the world.
“Erani delivers his lyrics of longing and disenfranchised love with a gruff sweetness while
guitarist/bassist Peter Claro and drummer [Darros Sandler] create a pure pop foundation
that pulses with a vibrant urgency . . . If Goodbye Cruel World is where The Melloncollies
start, the rest of the band’s journey is bound to be a thing of pop beauty.”
—Brian Baker, CityBeat
The Melloncollies
Album: Goodbye Cruel World
-Melloncollies debut on the top ten charts for Power Pop on Emusic- the largest retailer of
independent music on the world
-Melloncollies debut number one for the month of April on the Power Pop charts on Emusic
The Melloncollies were selected to be featured on the “NEW! Discover and Uncover” program
The Melloncollies have been selected as an “Artist to Watch- Alt Rock”
The promotion is live on 25 station websites
Station Name Market NEW! Format
KYSR-FM LOSANGELES-CA ALTERNATIVE
KDGE-FM DALLAS-TX ALTERNATIVE
KTBZ-FM HOUSTON-TX ALTERNATIVE
WRFF-FM PHILADELPHIA-PA ALTERNATIVE
WWDC-FM WASHINGTON-DC ALTERNATIVE
KTCL-FM DENVER-CO ALTERNATIVE
WCHH-FM BALTIMORE-MD ALTERNATIVE
WXDX-FM PITTSBURGH-PA ALTERNATIVE
WEND-FM CHARLOTTE-NC ALTERNATIVE
KCNL-FM SANJOSE-CA ALTERNATIVE
WRXS-FM COLUMBUS-OH ALTERNATIVE
WRZX-FM INDIANAPOLIS-IN ALTERNATIVE
WRXL-FM RICHMOND-VA ALTERNATIVE
KYRK-FM NEWORLEANS-LA ALTERNATIVE
WVVB-FM BIRMINGHAM-AL ALTERNATIVE
WXEG-FM DAYTON-OH ALTERNATIVE
WHRL-FM ALBANY-NY ALTERNATIVE
KUCD-FM HONOLULU-HI ALTERNATIVE
WMAX-FM GRANDRAPIDS-MI ALTERNATIVE
KTEG-FM ALBUQUERQUE-NM ALTERNATIVE
WTZB-FM SARASOTA-FL ALTERNATIVE
KRAB-FM BAKERSFIELD-CA ALTERNATIVE
KOSO-FM MODESTO/STOCKTON-CA ALTERNATIVE
WXSR-FM TALLAHASSEE-FL ALTERNATIVE

Somme Music/The Melloncollies have secured a worldwide distribution deal (Engine
Company/BDC)
With worldwide distribution, Goodbye Cruel World is put in every retail outlet on the globe
Ghost Whisperer
“Why Oh Why” by The Melloncollies heard on the Ghost Whisperer,
(starring Jennifer Love Hewitt)
Season 5 - Dead Air, January 2010
“The Melloncollies are great because they stay true to who they are . . . a band that wants to
put out great music filled with passion, a band that’s not afraid to defy stereotyped musical
genres. Goodbye Cruel World is an album filled with excitement because of this.”
—Samantha Cox, BMI
“Erani delivers his lyrics of longing and disenfranchised love with a gruff sweetness while
guitarist/bassist Peter Claro and drummer [Darros Sandler] create a pure pop foundation
that pulses with a vibrant urgency . . . If Goodbye Cruel World is where The Melloncollies
start, the rest of the band’s journey is bound to be a thing of pop beauty.”
—Brian Baker, CityBeat
“The Melloncollies, hailing from New York City, bring to us a blend of Soul Asylum's early days
and Jakob Dylan vocals. With indie flavor and '90s alternative emotional strains, the band's
northern exposure tour could do us all some good.”Consequence of Sound
David Buchanan consequenceofsound

REVIEWS
From City Beat, Brian Baker
Guitarist/singer/songwriter Simon Erani understands the all-important mechanics of Power Pop and
his New York trio, The Melloncollies, benefits greatly from his understanding. Just as importantly,
he has an intuitive feel for the way other musical forms dovetail in the genre, making a cool jigsaw
picture from the perfectly fitted pieces of New Wave, Punk and Garage Rock, all of it framed by
the infectious harmonies and electric effervescence of Power Pop. But perhaps Erani’s greatest gift
is in his understanding of Pop’s soul, and it is in that area where The Melloncollies shine the
brightest.
On Goodbye Cruel World, Erani delivers his lyrics of longing and disenfranchised love with a gruff
sweetness while guitarist/bassist Peter Claro and drummer Jeffrey Braha create a pure Pop
foundation that pulses with a vibrant urgency. There are elements of The Wallflowers’ expansive
sound in The Melloncollies’ presentation but there are also flecks of Elvis Costello’s early jittery
Punk Wave energy (“Lonliest Boy”), ’80s Synth Pop (“Bullet in My Sunday”), Bruce Springsteen’s
populist Rock (“Misery”) and The Gin Blossoms’ sweet guitar crunch (“Simple Naive Someone”).
“Money Money Money” is the sound of Bob Dylan fronting Cheap Trick, “You You Yeah Yeah”
stomps like The Romantics at their red-leather best and “All I Want” quivers with Jellyfishtributes-
The-Beatles passion. If Goodbye Cruel World is where The Melloncollies start, the rest of
the band’s journey is bound to be a thing of Pop beauty.
From Consequence of Sound- Brian Baker
Do not be fooled by the band name, this is not a Smashing Pumpkins clone. The Melloncollies,
hailing from New York City, bring to us a blend of Soul Asylum’s early days and Jakob Dylan
vocals. With indie flavor and ’90s alternative emotional strains, the band’s northern exposure tour
could do us all some good. They claim to have been inspired by artists like acclaimed songwriters
Elvis Costello and Jakob’s old man Bob Dylan.
Lyrically, this is not terribly far from the truth. Songs such as “Simple Naive Someone” hearken
back to “Everyday I Write The Book” with its kitschy performance and novelty pop-rock subject
matter. This romantic allure does not take away from a harder edge however, for the track “Money
Money Money” could almost be pegged as a late Dropkick Murphys cut, while “You You Yeah
Yeah” touches on The Pretenders and The Cranberries.
While it also brings out the early pop persuasion in everyone, this is a revival of all things 90s.
Energetic and not so retro that it becomes a throwaway immediately, The Melloncollies is an act
that would definitely suit a New York nightlife for those wanting an escapist nostalgic moment of
live music. The band’s music site, which celebrates a 1 year anniversary as of January
15th, is chock full of alternative bliss to indulge in.
y are only currently touring the upper east coast, if you
Though the happen to be in the neighborhood give them a try. Not too emo, not too cliche, The
Melloncollies are just the right medicine for the Wallflowers in all of us.
Indie Surfer Blog- Ziggy
The Melloncollies
With equal doses winsomeness and irreverence,
The Melloncollies are the latest in a hallowed line
of Brooklyn-bred quintets to unfurl the witty
sonic flag and punch back: yes, pop can be
daring.
Their debut album, Goodbye Cruel World, finds
the band-led by vocalist/guitarist Simon Erani
and rounded out by Peter Claro
(production/guitars), Darro Sandler(drums), Paul
Briscoe (bass) and Rick Treese (keys), in fine
lyric fettle, intent on matching their past
successes with their latest salvo. Goodbye Cruel
World has been called "an emotive exploration of
feelings, failures, and fun," a powerful departure from rote pop and saccharine schmaltz.
The full-length finds Erani and co. in spirited form, with some having remarked that The
Melloncollies "loosened their ties, rolled up their sleeves and went for it." The result is "a thrilling
and moving album, loaded with personality and irreverence." Fit for iPods and ambitious auteurs
alike, the work evokes the impact of the hallmark provocateurs: Dylan, Costello, Springsteen; The
Proclaimers, The Romantics, The Wallflowers, Maroon 5, all have a place in shaping one of this
year's most earnest releases.
Still, The Melloncollies' sound is
overwhelmingly their own. They blend a
spoonful of rock 'n' roll, a dollop of punk and a
sprinkle of classic pop, all smeared with garage
overtones. The sound first surfaced on The
Mellonollies' unreleased album, Simple Naïve
World, two tracks from which, "Simple Naïve
Someone" and "Maybe Someday," were featured
in Eight Days a Week, an independent film
starring Keri Russel. Goodbye Cruel World,
recorded in New York's Electric Lady Studio,
follows in the same electric rubric, with major
assistance from renowned sound engineers Josh
Wilbur (Pink) and Brian Sperber (Moby).
At their essence, The Melloncollies find their root
in "Melodies...Great melodies." Erani excels
behind a guitar and piano, creating the anthems that inspire the frontman to continue to compose
and record songs. As his work with The Melloncollies' becomes ever edgier and more
sophisticated, the eventual follow-up to Goodbye Cruel World will surely turn out like its
predecessor-timely and timeless at the same time. Recommended!
INDIE ROCK CAFÉ
The Melloncollies are the latest in a hallowed line of Brooklyn-bred quintets to unfurl the witty
sonic flag and punch back: yes, pop can be daring. Their debut album, Goodbye, Cruel World, is
abrasive, edgy and full of sheen. Another Brooklyn band poised to breakout in 2010.
UNDER THE RADAR- DR BRISTOL
Onomatopoeia [on‐ŏ‐mat‐ŏ‐pee‐ă], noun: he use of words that seem to imitate the sounds they
refer to (whack, fizz, crackle, hiss); or any combination of words in which the sound gives the
impression of echoing the sense.
Musically, The Melloncollies are anything but that. This debut is an exciting, emotional, explosive
pop album that is as spirit-lifting as it is well-crafted. Musically, I said.
Lyrically, however…well, that’s another story entirely. “I’d do anything for you / get my ass
kicked for you / what the hell did you ever do for me?” Simon Erani wails in “You You Yeah
Yeah”, and that’s one of the more docile song titles. “Loneliest Boy”, “Misery”, “So Unhappy”,
“Bullet in my Sunday”…these are not your classic love songs. I guess I should have been tipped off
by the album’s title (Goodbye Cruel World) but I admit I was caught off-guard.
The Smiths could make despair sound almost ambivalent, but The Melloncollies want to rip their
hearts out in full view and wave their sorrow flag under a floodlight. As Jeffrey Braha’s kick drum
counts off the album opener “Misery” in Springsteen-arena fashion, we’re momentarily fooled by
the promise of “I’ll be good to you” in the chorus, because the hook is huge and Erani’s vocal
so…positive. But that’s before we get to the second verse and realize the poor sap is on his knees
and for the wrong reason. The second track (“Bullet In My Sunday”) is equally catchy with an 80sish
intro reminiscent of Gene Loves Jezebel, so maybe there’s some hope here….except now the
guy has seen the girl with someone else and it’s starting to look hopeless. Great – now what?
Is this the great artistic statement about the angst of unrequited love? Of course not. Nor is it
delicate adult poetry about the frailty of the human heart. But it is an infectious, bombastic joyride
about getting your heart broken, getting depressed and then scraping every emotion out in
overblown, dramatic fashion. If you’re drinking off a break-up, this could be your soundtrack. If
you’re angry about a break-up…well, this could be your soundtrack, too.
Some will say it’s sophomoric, pedestrian and adolescent. Sure, it’s over the top (“whore” seems to
be a favorite lyrical term) and there’s a wee bit of whining and pity going on. So? Was “Beat On
The Brat” mature? In other words, don’t take it so seriously, because The Melloncollies aren’t.
They’re peppering the album with pop-punk DNA lifted from the last three decades; sometimes
subtly, sometimes overtly. Enjoy the ride.
Ballads like “Maybe Someday”, “All I Want” and “So Unhappy” could easily stand on their own
outside the context of the album, but when every track in the song cycle is so overtly dramatic they
tend to get lost in the shuffle. Instead, attention will likely lean more towards the infectious pop
chestnuts like “Why Oh Why” and ”Simple Naive Someone”, where Erani’s pleading vocals –
well above average for the genre – will appeal to any power-pop fan.
Besides “You You Yeah Yeah”, the real asskicker is “Money Money Money” which sounds like
Wreckless Eric mocking Bob Dylan (“could you bee-leeeve the aud-a-ci-teeeee“), a huge guitar
and organ driven rave-up with a sing-along chorus…well, about that bitch who only wants your
money. And although it took fifteen years, bonus points for someone finally reclaiming
“melloncollies” from that overrated concept album that clogged the airwaves for an entire year -
”Let It Rain” takes the Smashing Pumpkins formula and rips it a new one. (Even more bonus
points for “Spin The Tail On The Donkey“. ..you’re going to have to pick up the CD for that one,
folks).
With great production by Erani and guitarist Peter Claro, it’s an album that will justifiably get
more than several spins at high volume. I count on this one resurfacing when I compile my
favorites from 2009. Now excuse me while I overreact to something…and take that, Billy Corgan.
STRAIGHT NO CHASER
The cover shows four kids in a picture that looks like it’s from the 70′s. One is just standing there,
one has a cigarette in his mouth, a stuffed bunny in his hand and is pushing two babies in a stroller,
one is holding a bottle, the other a Jack Daniels bottle. Judging by the cover and the name of the
album, I thought that this was going to be a punk album. I was horribly wrong, but in a good way.
They are more of a 90′s alt-rock group like Better Than Ezra, Tonic or Dishwalla. “Bullet in my
Sunday” and “Simple Naive Someone” are perfect alt-rock gems and the rest of the tracks send you
straight back to the days of flannel. Initially, I was so thrown off by their sound, that I hated this
album. After a couple of listens, it has really grown on me and has become one of my favorites.
Everybody with a love for 90′s alt-rock, like me, needs to have this album.
Interview with Such Cool Stuff
The Melloncollies
“I wouldn’t say that I’ve had the best luck with women. And after listening to the album, I suppose
everyone else is going to know that as well.”
Don’t feel sorry for singer/songwriter Simon Erani, the force behind The Melloncollies and their
debut album Goodbye Cruel World. He prefers to wear his real-life melancholy on his sleeve like a
badge of honor. And as the band creates a unique blend of everything from 80’s synth pop to 90’s
arena grunge rock, the lyrics draw creative inspiration from one of mankind’s oldest and most
universal sources—a broken heart.
From the first seconds of the melodically-drenched opening track “Bullet In My Sunday,” Erani’s
vocals and keyboards, Peter Claro’s guitars and bass, and Darros Sandler’s drums combine with an
energy and ferocity that make this Brooklyn-based band sound like anything but a freshman act.
Just as you find yourself singing along with the last chorus, the hook-laden “Simple Naïve
Someone” has you believing in love again.
While Erani’s vocals may bring to mind such unabashedly clean pop singers as Bleu or Robin
Wilson of The Gin Blossoms, he can also muster up the rock-and-roll rawness of Paul Westerberg
of The Replacements or Dave Pirner of Soul Asylum. Such is the case with the track “You You
Yeah Yeah,” a night-driving wailer in pursuit of yet another what-went-wrong. In striking contrast,
a string quartet joins a lonely nylon-stringed guitar as the rock ballad “All I Want ” answers that
angry question with crestfallen acceptance.
“Let It Rain” picks up the pace with a driving four-on-the-floor beat reminiscent of The
Cranberries hit “Dream,” and Erani once again turns a storm into a renewing baptism as he sings
this open letter to an absent father. Then with the surprising edginess of Billy Corgan backed by
bright crunchy guitars and Smashing Pumpkins-sized drumbeats, “Why Oh Why” hits on the irony
of conflicted relationships, followed by a peaceful moment of hopeful reflection in the beautiful
ballad “Maybe Someday”.
This near-optimism continues to twist through the straight-ahead rocker “Misery” and the buzzy
“Criminal Girl ”, then turns back to the solitary sadness of lost love in the “The Loneliest Boy”.
“Money Money Money” ends the album in a raucous nosedive, with flaming guitars and doubletime
drums playing Oasis to Erani’s Dylan as he unveils the “real” reason for his perpetually
crashing romantic life. For the diehard fans, the full-album download also includes a stunning
acoustic guitar and string quartet version of “Let It Rain.”
Produced by Peter Claro and Simon Erani and mastered by Blake Morgan, Goodbye Cruel World
makes Erani’s songs resonate with past angst and buried emotions while The Melloncollies
simultaneously radiate with a genuine enthusiasm and sincerity rarely encountered in today’s
pop/rock scene. Together with the support of their label Somme Music and new worldwide
distribution through Engine Company Records, the band is poised to capture a whole new audience
of freshly broken hearts around the world.
How do you describe your music to people, Simon?
I would say, heavy with mood yet surprisingly exciting. I like to think of our music as a moving
contradiction- upbeat drama! When I was younger I developed a love for women that rivaled my
love for music, and figured I’d might as well combine the two forces and see the result, which in
turn ended up being our album, Goodbye Cruel World. If you aren’t lucky in love, I’d say our
music is for you, after all- I’m in a band called the Melloncollies!
There’s a band in the seventies called the Raspberries, with Eric Carmen, I frequently have had
people compare them to us. I take this as a huge compliment- have you ever heard of them? I’d say
they’re right up my alley and I pay my homage to them.
Other than that, sound wise, I would have to say that our music is power pop and rock/pop. I’m a
sucker for a killer love song. Our music is loaded with a raw pop sounds in our melodies and we
follow a pop structure that’s simple and gives people what they want. We follow the K.I.S.S. model
and I try not to think too much into it when I write, some times less is more.
Tell me about how you originally got into your craft.
It goes back to when I was six and in kindergarten. I used to play drumbeats with my hands on the
table and people would always shoot me looks of surprise. My dad bought me my first set of
bongos, and I start[ed] playing with them and singing songs. From there I did a few talent shows
and won a few awards- even though at the time I never really saw the relevance or importance of
winning them. My dad loved rock and my mom loved pop- so they put me in the middle of some
sick game [of] tug-of-war growing up. My dad got me a set of drums with a mic, and I used to go
nuts and play rocks songs. This, naturally, drove my mother insane, so her answer was to buy me
an acoustic guitar. I started teaching myself how to play by ear and used the music my mother
loved to listen to as reference, and by the way, she loved pop love songs. My father didn’t mind so
much, but just to keep the game going and to annoy my mother, he bought me an electric guitar and
amp! Hey, I’m not complaining, it obviously worked in my favor!
It wasn’t until I was eleven that I started to write songs and I started performing shortly after. At
fifteen, I was in a band called “Night Brigade” as the singer and drummer, and we put out two
records called “Got a place in my heart” and “Make Believe.” I remember I used to play the drums
standing up, trying to stand out and be unique, but in time we got another drummer and I was
playing guitar and singing lead vocals. I was a little kid, new and unsure of what to expect, and then
college radio started playing our songs. My band was older than I was, so they would play these
clubs like CBGB’s and Stone Pony, Maxes in Kansas City, which were pretty big clubs at the time
that were interested in our songs. They had no clue what my age was, and one time at CBGB’S the
police came and waited for me to finish my set. They scared the hell out of me and told me they
could take me to jail and brought me home.
Of course my mother nearly collapsed when this happened. She had no idea I was playing clubs
and warned me to not play then until I was a few years older. Especially because at that time, my
father passed away and she had to take care of 5 us, and we were animals! Since then my band
snuck me in a huge and large amp case. When my mom found out again she used to scream and run
after me with her slipper and whack me. When her birthday came around, I bought her the softest
pair of slippers because there was no way I was going to stop playing. And here I am- with the
Melloncollies and haven’t looked back.
What is your favorite thing to do in the whole wide world?
Now that I’m older, and hopefully wiser, I would say being on the beach and swimming in the
ocean. There’s something at peace with the world when you’re laying there. I really appreciate it
and love it. I have a really hectic life- I run two businesses and rarely get any time to myself,
between writing music and keeping both companies on their feet. So if there’s a chance I can get to
snag some alone time in the ocean, I’m there, with do not disturb all over my face.
What is your biggest challenge when it comes to running your business?
The biggest challenge in running your business is running your business. I run two companies,
Somme Institute, and Somme Music, and I swear it’s like I’m the energizer bunny banging on those
drums all day. Not to mention, they’re in completely different fields and industries. I’m also an
artist on our label, which also cuts into my time with the Melloncollies. It’s not just running the
business- it’s finding the balance!
Music isn’t what it used to be anymore and that is terrifying and exciting at same time. I feel this is
also the time for independent artists to shine. The last decade really flipped the music industry and
everyone is searching for the next best business model. We live in a world that’s searching “in-the
cloud” and beefed up on smart phones that you can watch be on. Everyone is scratching
their heads trying to figure out how to survive all the changes, while independent artists are like,
“Okay, where have you been?” You have to be innovative when you’re strictly indie and work
twice as hard as the major labels- we have a constant contingency plan.
I have a small team at Somme Music, and we’re always working, and luckily, we set up our
worldwide distribution with Engine Company Records and that really propelled us to where we
needed to be. It’s the connections you make while you’re running a business that can make or break
you. The hardest part is working with what you have. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but
absolutely challenging. We brainstorm every day on how to make our company stand on its feet
with our resources. It also makes the breaks you get, like working with Engine, really appreciated.
When you were a kid, what did you think you were going to be when you grew up?
That's a good question, I really never thought of it when I was young. I was always getting into
trouble and always in the principal's office. All I was doing was avoiding my mother’s slippers
when I was coming home. I guess I always knew in the back of my mind I was going to do
something in music. My strength was always my song writing and it was always a dream of mine
to be like Burt Bacharach and Hal David (who wrote songs for Dionne Warwick who had many
number one hits in the late 60’s and 70’s.) I guess that’s every songwriters dream, though.
In what way has your community impacted your development as a musician?
I don’t like to think myself as a product of my environment. I’ve always done my own thing,
listened to music, and wrote songs. Music was always in my life, and that’s really all I needed. I
don’t see that being any different if I was born in Guam, or if I was raised in Alabama. I hope this
isn’t boring, I know some people love to hear a good “rags to riches” story but music is really the
only thing that fuels me. I’m from a very tight-knit community in NYC, they’re always willing to
support the Melloncollies and their work, which is great. The best I can say in recent years is
juggling the time of being in fast-paced New York and running two companies. It has really
matured my songwriting, being in a hectic city forces you to concentrate on your art.
What other artists out there do you love?
Bob Dylan has influenced me in many different ways. I think he is one of the best songwriters of
all time. His mark on music has impacted millions of aspiring artists. I love Elvis because he’s the
king, and I’m not one to disrespect royalty. I also really love Elvis Costello, and always keep him
in the back of my mind when I’m writing material. I would say off our latest album “Bullet In My
Sunday” and “You You Yeah Yeah” echo this influence, and the album has the upbeat power pop
feel that the Raspberries so cleverly mastered. On the other end of the scope is Barry White. I
know it’s totally different, Dylan vs. White, but I’m sure everyone has their own eclectic mixes on
their iPods. The reason why I love these artists is because they had a vision. Any great musician
you see out there, past or present, has a vision, and they never surrender it. How can you not love
an artist with a vision? It makes [their] music even more entertaining and pushes me to polish my
own.
What does your future hold?
Lots and lots of planning. The Melloncollies are going to follow up Goodbye Cruel World and
experiment with different sounds and types of music. It’s going to be a great time and I can’t wait
to see the finished product. I love getting in the room with the guys and seeing what we bring to the
table.
As for Somme Music, we’re definitely looking to grow and build our company. We’re keep our
eyes peeled for artists that want to raise the bar and are committed to growing and their art. We
want to be a label after artists' own hearts and can expand our roster. Especially in New York City,
which I think is the greatest city in the world, we want to help as many talented musicians as
possible. And hopefully there will be some time to be on the beach…
Out of over 15,000 entries from over 100 countries, the International Songwriting Competition
(ISC) would like to congratulate The Melloncollies for their song, “Simple Naïve Someone,” which
won an Honorable Mention in the AAA (Adult Album Alternative) category in ISC 2010. With its
beatlesque melodies and strong chorus, the song was a stand out for ISC’s celebrity judges, which
included Tom Waits, Kings of Leon, Robert Smith (The Cure), Rihanna, Peter Gabriel and many
more.
The Melloncollies on FOX TV's Traffic Light
"Money Money Money" will be featured in an episode of FOX TV's new hit comedy series Traffic
Light on March 22. "You You Yeah Yeah" was featured in an earlier episode.
#2 Rock Album on AirPlay Direct
Goodbye Cruel World reached #2 on AirPlay Direct's Rock Chart for the month of October 2010,
placing right behind The Pretenders Live In London.
#1 Power Pop Album on eMusic
Following its April 2010 debut on eMusic, Goodbye Cruel World hit #1 on eMusic's Power Pop
chart.
The Melloncollies Featured on iHeartRadio
The Melloncollies were selected to be featured on iHeartRadio's NEW! Discover and Uncover
program, a live promotion on 25 radio station websites across the country including KYSR-FM in
Los Angeles, KDGE-FM in Dallas, and WRFF-FM in Philadelphia. They have also been selected
as an "Alt Rock Artist to Watch."
"Why Oh Why" Featured on The Ghost Whisperer
The song "Why Oh Why" was featured on CBS's The Ghost Whisperer starring Jennifer Love
Hewitt. The Season 5 episode "Dead Air" originally aired January 2010.
Somme Music Secures Worldwide Distribution Deal with Engine Company Records
Somme Music has signed as a sub-label with Engine Company Records, securing worldwide
distribution through Burnside Distribution Company.
"I don’t doubt The Melloncollies familiar sound will become more familiar if they can continue
putting out songs like these."
—Kevin Kozel, Muzic Reviews
"Erani delivers his lyrics of longing and disenfranchised love with a gruff sweetness while
guitarist/bassist Peter Claro and drummer [Darros Sandler] create a pure pop foundation that pulses
with a vibrant urgency . . . If Goodbye Cruel World is where The Melloncollies start, the rest of the
band’s journey is bound to be a thing of pop beauty."
—Brian Baker, CityBeat
"Everybody with a love for 90's alt-rock, like me, needs to have this album."
—Straight No Chaser
"This debut is an exciting, emotional, explosive pop album that is as spirit-lifting as it is wellcrafted."
—Dr. Bristol's Prescription, Under The Radar
"The Melloncollies are the latest in a hallowed line of Brooklyn-bred quintets to unfurl the witty
sonic flag and punch back: yes, pop can be daring."
—Indie Rock Cafe
". . . The eventual follow-up to Goodbye Cruel World will surely turn out like its predecessor—
timely and timeless at the same time. Recommended!"
—Indie Surfer Blog
"Not too emo, not too cliche, The Melloncollies are just the right medicine for the Wallflowers in
all of us."
—David Buchanan, Consequence of Sound
Read the feature and interview on Such Cool Stuff.
Buy the Album:
on iTunes
on Amazon
on eMusic
Visit The Melloncollies at these official websites:
on .TheMelloncollies
on Pandora
on be
on
on
on ReverbNation
on
969 3rd avenue
floor 3
new york, ny 10022
212.593.0070
infosommemusic
.sommemusic

Screen name:
robert1163162
Member since:
Oct 29 2016
Active within 24 hours
Level of commitment:
Very Committed
Years together:
3
Gigs played:
10 to 50
Tend to practice:
1 time per week
Age:
39 years

MUSIC