RXS
CONTACT

SEEKING

Band to Join, Vocalist, Bass Guitar, Drums, Keyboard.

ABOUT

Very experienced guitar player and harmony singer looking for committed, working, Classic Rock band. Prefer to play 6-8 times per month, primarily on weekends. Regular rehearsals a necessity. Prefer an established band, but willing to build from the ground up if there's sufficient potential. Full PA gear, lights, trailer to haul it in and studio to rehearse in. I'm not sure I have too much faith in Bandmix's notification service so, if you'd like to contact me directly, my email is montelle@satx.rr.com.

My philosophy is that in order for a band to be tight, you have to play. A lot. If you're only looking to gig once or twice a month, then I'm not the droid you're looking for. Will this kind of band interfere with your weekly fishing trips to Corpus, Saturday softball games, Friday night bowling league, weekend pool parties? Yes. But if you're the type of musician I'm searching for, that's not really a problem because you'd rather be on stage than doing any of those other mundane activities.

And while we're talking philosophy, I'd like to mention that this is NOT a hobby. I treat this like a second job. Once a gig is booked, it's booked. Don't call me the week before a band job and ask if we can cancel because you want to go on vacation, or your great aunt Hilda's birthday celebration is coming up or your sister scheduled a family reunion for that date and you forgot. Of course there are legitimate reasons for having to cancel a gig, but convenience is not one of them. Generally speaking, if your day job boss wouldn't accept it as a reason for missing work, it's not an acceptable reason for cancelling a gig.

We also have to rehearse at least weekly. Toward that end, when I built my current home, I had a sound-proofed rehearsal studio designed into it. There is direct access to the studio from the outside and it has its own heating/cooling system. We're comfortable even on the hottest south Texas days. I have a Roland TD-20 drum kit set up so drummers don't have to drag a kit in, set up and then tear down after rehearsal. The room has its own monitor system complete with subs. Bass players - you can go direct through the board; you don't need an amp unless you want to. You can use either the live room sound or bring your own in-ear setup. The room is set up for recording and we can record rehearsals and/or demos.

Generally, gigs on weeknights are verboten. A few a year with plenty of advance warning are OK, but my day job requires me to be awake and alert and so pretty much precludes band jobs in the middle of the week.

Also, if you are in my band, then you're not in another band too. As you can tell, I plan for us to be busy and so you won't have time to mess with anyone else. It's almost impossible to do advance booking when I have to work around your schedule in some other band so, if you're not willing to commit to one enterprise, then please look elsewhere.

Screen name:
RXS
Member since:
Mar 05 2009
Active within 24 hours
Level of commitment:
Very Committed
Years playing music:
55
Gigs played:
Over 100
Tend to practice:
1 time per week
Available to gig:
2-3 nights a week
Most available:
Nights

Influences

If it's from the 60's, 70's or 80's, rocks and has a guitar solo, it's an influence. There's a tiny dab of 90's and later in there too but, let's face it, if you're a guitarist, there's very little of note in the 90's or later. Artists that excite me include: Night Ranger, Deep Purple, REO Speedwagon, Captain Beyond, April Wine, Bon Jovi, Boston, David Coverdale, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Damn Yankees, David Lee Roth, Van Halen, Sammy Hagar, Doobie Brothers, Doors, Eddie Money, Firehouse, Foreigner, Gary Hoey, Gary Moore, Heart, Huey Lewis, Humble Pie, J. Geils, Iron Butterfly, Joe Walsh, Jeff Healey, Jimi Hendrix, Journey, Judas Priest, Kansas, Led Zeppelin, Mr. Big, Santana, ZZ Top, etc. Beginning to see a common thread here?

That's not to say I won't play the occasional odd song from another genre, but it's rare. I know many musicians say, "You have to give the people what they want" meaning that you have to play all kinds of music. I respectfully disagree with that. I say "You have to play what you're good at and what you enjoy." If you're digging what you're laying down and the band is smokin', you're going to carry the audience right along with you. I also think you have to give them things nobody else can. Ain't nobody needs another rendition of Proud Mary, Brown-eyed Girl, Gimme Three Steps and so forth. Let's do Black Betty or Do You Feel Like We Do or Cliffs of Dover.

Then there's the folks that believe we're not 'in concert' so there's no need to behave like it. Really? As far as I'm concerned, 'in concert' is exactly what I'm about. I'm not interested in being a human jukebox. I want lights, I want smoke, I want a show.

And, of course, the question of original material always comes up. I've lost count of how many times I've been told that nobody wants to hear something they've never heard before. They want to hear what they know. This is patently ridiculous. Why? Consider that every single tune that they already know was once a song they'd never heard before. They liked it when they heard it for the first time. There's no reason I can see why an audience would suddenly lose the ability to like a new song.

Instrument experience:

Lead Guitar:
Expert
Background Singer:
Moderate

EQUIPMENT

My guitar rig is a bit unusual. I use a Roland VG-99 unit rather than a traditional guitar amp and speaker setup. This gives me incredible flexibility. I can emulate many different kinds of guitars (Fenders, Gibsons, Rickenbackers, Dan Electros, acoustics, sitar, banjo, mandolin, etc.) as well as many different types of amps and speakers combined with a host of effects and the ability to change tunings on the fly. For example, I can play a song in standard tuning, then step on a switch and retune instantly to open E to play the slide solo, and then flip back to standard tuning. I do this on the Rocky Mountain Way video. I run my guitar direct through the PA and simply fold it back through the monitor system. I find this not only works well for me and reduces the amount of gear I need to carry, but it also allows me control over my volume. I don't have to crank an amp to sound good.

As I mentioned earlier, I have a full PA setup. 10,000 watts of amps, 4 tops, 4 subs, monitors, a trailer, lights and a soundperson. This a very flexible system and can be configured for very small gigs up to just about anything short of a county fair. You can see it on the Byron P. Steele auditorium video.

I record almost every gig using multiple video cameras. The videos that you see on this page that have a title sequence and credits were recorded by me. Others were recorded by audience members.

If you actually read all the preceding text, congratulations! I know a lot of it sounds pretty curmudgeonly, but it's actually just the distillation of many decades in this business. I know what I need and I'm only trying to save both of us from wasting time when we're not a good fit for each other.

If, however, all this sounds good to you, then please get in touch with me. We just might be able to make some magic.

MUSIC